The Photographic Collection of Georges Dimitria Boria




Employed by the U.S. Army Signal Corps, G. Dimitria Boria was the supervisor of the color photographic laboratory of the Far East Command during the Occupation of Japan, 1947-1952.

In 1990 he donated over 30,000 images to the MacArthur Archives.

G. Dimitria Boria in the Far East Command photo laboratory, Tokyo, Japan, ca. 1947-1952.

G. Dimitria Boria in the Far East Command photo laboratory,
Tokyo, Japan,
ca. 1947-1952.


Boria with Far East Command’s Signal Corps chief, BGEN George I Back, in a Japanese town.

Boria with Far East Command’s Signal Corps chief, BGEN George I Back, in a Japanese town.
Boria was a scissorette artist and used the art form to gain instant affinity with his photographic subjects.


Although best known for his color photography, Boria was a master of the black and white form as well.

Although best known for his color photography, Boria was a master of the black and white form as well.
In this photo a Japanese fisherman casts his net.
Ca. 1950


This scene shows the courtroom of the International Military Tribunal for the Far East.

Boria’s job in Japan was to document the Allied Occupation of Japan.
This scene shows the courtroom of the International Military Tribunal for the Far East.
Former premier of Japan, General Hideki Tojo, is on the stand.
Ca. 1948.


Japan’s most famous post war politician, 
Prime Minister Shigeru Yoshida, ca. 1950.

Japan′s most famous post war politician,
Prime Minister Shigeru Yoshida,
ca. 1950.


May Day demonstration in Tokyo, ca. 1952.

May Day demonstration in Tokyo,
ca. 1952.


This is an Ainu chief and his wife on the island of Hokkaido.  Ca. 1948

Boria also captured many images of the culture of Japan.
This is an Ainu chief and his wife on the island of Hokkaido.
Ca. 1948


Japanese Geisha, ca. 1947.

Japanese Geisha,
ca. 1947.


Mount Fujiyama and an old Japanese woman. Ca. 1947-1952.

Mount Fujiyama and an old Japanese woman.
Ca. 1947-1952.


Japanese children of the post war era.

Japanese children of the post war era.


 

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