World War I Podcast Season Six

Produced by the MacArthur Memorial to commemorate the centennial of World War I (1914-1918), the World War I History Podcast explores the history of the war from a variety of perspectives.

From the assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand, to the Zimmerman Telegram, the Red Baron, trench warfare, the Christmas Truce and Lawrence of Arabia, this podcast series will answer some of the major questions of the war. 

What were the causes? Who were the major players? How did this war redraw the political and social map of the world? And most importantly, why does this war still matter?

Questions? Comments? Suggestions? Contact Amanda Williams.


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Doughboys and Marines of World War I

Dr. Edward Lengel, author of Never in Finer Company: The Men of the Great War's Lost Battalion, describes the exploits of American soldiers and Marines on the battlefields of 1918. (33:50)
Never in Finer Company
The Myth of Montfaucon

William Walker, author of Betrayal at Little Gibraltar, explores the controversy that surrounds the 1918 fight for Montfaucon and argues that changes need to be made in terms of how that tragic battle is interpreted. (28:13)
Betrayal at Little Gibralter
How Pershing's Warriors Came of Age

Dr. Mitchell Yockelson, author of Forty-Seven Days, How Pershing's Warriors Came of Age to Defeat the German Army in World War I, discusses the evolution of the A.E.F. as a fighting force and how American troops "came of age" during the Meuse-Argonne campaign. (35:23)

Forty Seven Days
Spanish Flu

In the final years of World War I, a deadly influenza pandemic killed about 3% of the world's population. The pandemic effected both the Allied and Central Powers, as well as neutral nations. Due to wartime censorship, belligerent nations made no public acknowledgement of the crisis. For neutral nations like Spain however, the pandemic was widely reported because there was no censorship in place. Accordingly, the pandemic became associated with Spain. 

In this interview, Dr. Marble Sanders, Senior Historian of the U.S. Army Medical Department Office of Medical History, discusses the origins and spread of Spanish Flu and why it was more than just a tragic coda to World War I. (16:49)
Spanish Flu Poster

Shell Shock

During World War I, the public was made aware of a condition known as shell shock that was affecting a significant number of soldiers.  From 1915-1918, the diagnosis of shell shock evolved, as medical professionals attempted to determine if the condition was physical, psychological, or moral (i.e. cowardice).  In this interview, Dr. Marble Sanders, Senior Historian of the U.S. Army Medical Department Office of Medical History, discusses shell shock and how doctors tried to diagnose, treat, and even prevent shell shock during World War I. (17:42)
Shell Shock
Mustard Gas

Chemical weapons were one of the great horrors of the World War I battlefield.  While different types of gases were used throughout the war, Mustard Gas was the most prominent and most effective chemical weapon in use by 1917.  In this interview, Dr. Marble Sanders, Senior Historian of the U.S. Army Medical Department Office of Medical History, provides an overview of Mustard Gas and discusses the U.S. Army’s efforts to counter this weapon. (18:59)

Mustard Gas

The Battle of Chateau Thierry

The Battle of Chateau Thierry (July 18, 1918) marked an important turning point in World War I.  In this podcast, TRADOC Deputy Chief Historian Stephen C. McGeorge places the Battle of Chateau Thierry in the wider context of the war and discusses the cooperation between U.S. and French forces during the battle.  (49:50)


Chateau Thierry